“Boerenkool”, Mashed Potatoes with Kale

If you like your kids to eat veggies, this is the way to go. And what better than to start with the power-food kale. “Boerenkool” is a typical Dutch winter dish made of mashed potatoes and kale served with a “Rookworst” or smoked sausage.

Serves: 4 | Preparation: 20 min | Cooking time: 30 min

Who connected us?!  This recipe comes from an old cookbook I inherited “Het Margriet Kookboek”. The Dutch bible for cooking in the 60ies and 70ies.

Ingredients:

  • 1,5 kg potatoes (pick the ones that are good for mashing)
  • 1 kg kale (curly kale)
  • 1 cup milk (room temperature)
  • 50 grams butter (room temperature)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Rookworst (smoked sausage)

Instructions:

  1. Peel, wash and cut the potatoes in equal-sized pieces.
  2. Put the potatoes in a large pot, and fill with water until the potatoes are almost covered.
  3. Clean the kale by cutting off the curly leaves of the stems. Thoroughly was the kale and finely shop the leaves.
  4. Put the chopped kale on top of the potatoes and cook for about 30 minutes until the potatoes are done.
  5. If you are lucky to have a traditional “rookworst” (smoked sausage) put the smoked sausage on top of the kale for the last 10 minutes. This is just to warm-up the sausage, you can’t heat the “rookworst” to much because it will burst.
  6. Mash the potato and kale together, and mix trough the milk and butter.
  7. Serve with the smoked sausage, or alternatively beef sausage or meatballs.

About kale

Kale is in fashion, or maybe this is old news by the time you read this. Kale is a power-food used in smoothies, salads, on sandwiches, you name it. But the Dutch have been eating this high fibre vegetable for centuries. Kale is among the most nutrient dense foods you can find, high in anti-oxidants, a good source of vitamins c and vitamins k. Kale can help lower cholesterol which may reduce the risk of heart disease. No wonder that we are looking for ways to incorporate this powerful vegetable in our daily food.

About Boerenkool

Boerenkool or Boerenkool stampot in full, is very traditional Dutch comfort food that is commonly served in winter. In the Netherlands we believe that the Curly Kale like Brussel Sprouts or Parsnip are at its best after a few nights of frost. The reason is quite simple: freezing temperatures cause some of the starches in the vegetables to convert to sugars, which greatly enhances the flavour.

The Dutch very much like their “stampot” (mashed potato) dishes. They combine it with all sorts of vegetables. Although “Boerenkool stampot” is the most recognised winter dish, it rivals with; “Andijvie stampot” (mashed potatoes with endive), “Zuurkool stampot” (mashed potatoes with Sour Cabbage) or “Hutspot” (mashed potatoes with onions and carrots)

Mashed potatoes with kale and beef sausage
Mashed potatoes with kale and beef sausage

Notes:

  • Rookworst; If you can’t find a smoked sausage, a good quality beef sausage or meatballs are a perfect alternative.
  • Potatoes; Choose a potato variety that is good for mashing. Potatoes that are high in starch with a floury texture are best.
  • Grandmas recipe: I gave you the traditional recipe for Boerenkool Stampot, but as with so many recipes, every family is raised with their own secret ingredients. My grandma used to add “spekjes” (fried bacon or pancetta). But I have even seen varieties with apple or pineapple to make the dish sweeter.
  • Room temperature: I leave the milk and butter at room temperature, so when I mix it trough the “stampot” it does not cool down the dish too much.

2 Comments Add yours

  1. It looks yummy. Please check out my blog as well. I am a travel blogger form India.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s